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Saturday, April 18, 2020 | History

4 edition of Speech of Mr. Meigs, of New York, on the restriction of slavery in Missouri. found in the catalog.

Speech of Mr. Meigs, of New York, on the restriction of slavery in Missouri.

Delivered in the House of representatives ... January 25, 1820.

by Henry Meigs

  • 4 Want to read
  • 24 Currently reading

Published in [Washington .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Missouri compromise.,
  • Slavery -- United States -- Speeches in Congress.

  • Edition Notes

    ContributionsMiscellaneous Pamphlet Collection (Library of Congress)
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsE373 .M5
    The Physical Object
    Pagination8 p.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL22894051M
    LC Control Number01023317

    A third, Mr. Justice Nelson Nelson, gives a separate opinion upon a single point in the case, with which I concur, assuming that the Circuit Court Circuit Court had jurisdiction; but he abstains altogether from expressing any opinion upon the eighth section of the act of , known commonly as the Missouri Missouri Compromise law, and six of. Mr. Cilley, in a speech in the House of Representatives, in February, , charged that James Watson Webb, the editor of the “New York Courier and Enquirer,” had received a bribe of fifty-two thousand dollars from the Bank of the United States.   Mr. POINDEXTER, of Mississippi, said he fully concurred with the gentleman from New York, in his solicitude to expel from our country, whenever practicable, anything like slavery. It is not with us, said he, a matter of choice whether we will have slaves among us or not; we found them here, and we are obliged to maintain and employ them. The sheets of the minutes book for theso years a bespetterod with recordings of such oftemes as, "stmeainu e " "molestsn8 Coluia citisens," ad "enterig the house of an Infamous mulatto," end In the aseo of moe student "brandishng a pistol in defense of property not his ow."5 To Samel eid, yog Prestom, wrote that the mjority of the students ware.

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Speech of Mr. Meigs, of New York, on the restriction of slavery in Missouri. by Henry Meigs Download PDF EPUB FB2

Speech of Mr. Meigs, of New York, on the restriction of slavery in Missouri. Delivered in the House of representatives Janu [Henry Meigs [from old catalog] Miscellaneous Pamphlet Collection (Library of Congress) DLC [from old catalog]] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Genre/Form: Speeches in Congress: Additional Physical Format: Print version: Meigs, Henry, Speech of Mr. Meigs, of New York, on the restriction of slavery in Missouri.

Speech of Mr. Cook, of Illinois, on the restriction of slavery in Missouri. Also available in digital form. Card also lists JKA4 vol. 3, no. 12 as a call number for this item, and says that it is vol. 3, no. 12 in a collection. New York: J. Jennings, printer, Speech of Mr.

Meigs, of New York, on the restriction of slavery in Missouri. Delivered in the House of Representatives. Speech of Mr. John Van Dyke of New Jersey, Delivered in the House of Representatives of the U.

States, March 4,on the Subject of Slavery, and in Vindication of the North From the Charges Brought Against it by the South (Washington: Gideon and Co., ), by John Van Dyke (page images at HathiTrust).

(New York: D. Appleton and Company, ), by Thomas Hart Benton (page images at HathiTrust) Speech of Mr. Macon, on the restriction of slavery in Missouri. ([Washington, ]), by Nathaniel Macon (page images at HathiTrust) Speech of W. Fessenden, of Maine, against the repeal of the Missouri prohibition, north of 36 30'.

The Missouri Compromise was United States federal legislation that admitted Maine to the United States as a free state, simultaneously with Missouri as a slave state—thus maintaining the balance of power between North and South in the United States part of the compromise, the legislation prohibited slavery north of the 36°30′ parallel, excluding Missouri.

Abolitionism (or the Anti-Slavery Movement) in the United States of America was the movement which sought to end slavery in the United States, active both before and during the American Civil the Americas and western Europe, abolitionism was a movement which sought to end the Atlantic slave trade and set slaves free.

In the 17th century, enlightenment thinkers. Then Mr. Thomas, a Senator from Illinois, on Januproposed that no restriction as to slavery be imposed upon Missouri in framing a state constitution, but that in all the rest of the country ceded by France to the United States north of 36° 30', this being the southern boundary line of Missouri, there should be neither slavery nor.

Full text of "A history of the struggle for slavery extension or restriction in the United States [electronic resource] from the Declaration of Independence to the present compiled and condensed from the journals of Congress and other official records, and showing the vote by yeas and nays on the most important divisions in either house.

opposed the repeal of the Missouri compromise. TAYLOR, of New York, said that the ex citement which this bill had produced is rapidly giving way to sober reason, which leads to right conclusions. He held to non-intervention in the local affairs of the Territctries, including slavery.

As to the Missouri law ofthere was no com pact. The primary source of Calhoun’s political essays, speeches, and letters that appear in this volume is the Works of John C. Calhoun (New York, –), edited by Calhoun’s friend and confidant, Richard K.

Crallé. Whenever possible, the text of Crallé has been carefully compared to other printed copies of the speeches and writings of.

Full text of "A history of the struggle for slavery extension or restriction in the United States, from the Declaration of Independence to the present compiled and condensed from the journals of Congress and other official records, and showing the vote by yeas and nays on the most important divisions in either house" See other formats.

The Missouri Compromise was the legislation that provided for the admission of Maine to the United States as a free state along with Missouri as a slave state, thus maintaining the balance of power between North and South in the United States part of the compromise, slavery was prohibited north of the 36°30′ parallel, excluding 16th.

Meigs County telegraph. [volume] (Pomeroy [Ohio])MaImage 1, brought to you by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus. April 19th, Congress having the Massachusetts, Connecticut, New-York, Vir- aforesaid Report under consideration, Mr.

ginia, North Carolina, and Georgia, laid Spaight, of N. C., moved the striking out of Page 4 ~4 ~ THE STRUGGLE FOR SLAVERY RESTRICTION. the above paragraph. About this Title: The second of two collections of anti-slavery tracts published by the American Anti-Slavery Society between It consists of 25 pamphlets written by William Lloyd Garrison, Daniel O'Connell, Maria Child, Wendell Phillips, and others.

The Missouri Compromise is the title generally attached to the legislation passed by the 16th United States Congress on May 9, The measures provided for the admission of Maine as a free state along with Missouri as a slave state, thus maintaining the balance of power between North and South in the United States part of the compromise, slavery was.

An amendment protecting slavery is adopted in the Congress. It fails, however, to be ratified by the states. Senator Seward of New York says, in speech before the Senate, “The alarm is appalling; for the Union is not more the body than liberty is the soul of the nation A continuance ” [6] February 1, Mr.

Meigs of New York obtained the floor. "Mr. Chairman, it is well known that the Legislature of New York has requested the state's representatives, here, to vote for the restriction upon Missouri.

I have examined the mass of argument, pro and con, on this question and I freely own that I cannot consent to impose this restriction upon Missouri.

Speech of Mr. John Van Dyke, of New Jersey: delivered in the House of Representatives of the U. States, March 4,on the subject of slavery, and in vindication of the North from the charges brought against it by the South.

Dred Scott, of St. Louis, in the State of Missouri, and a citizen of the State of Missouri, complains of John F.A. Sandford, of the City of New York, and a citizen of the State of New York, in the plea of trespass for that the defendant heretofore, to wit: on the 1st day of January, A.D.

at St. Louis, in the County of St. Louis and State. The American conflict: a history of the great rebellion in the United States of America, ' its causes, incidents, and results: intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases, with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from to the close of the war for the union.

Having thus resolved the whole matter into a mere question of Missouri law, Mr. Justice Nelson proceeds to comment on the decisions in that State and elsewhere as to the effect of a return (after residing in a country in which mere residence made him free) to a slaveholding country by one who left it a slave; as to which Mr.

Justice Nelson. The last revised edition of the whole work appeared in six volumes (New York, '85). Bancroft has been correspondent of the royal academy of Berlin, and also of the French institute; was made D. at Oxford inand Doctor Juris by the university of Bonn inand in September,celebrated at Berlin the fiftieth.

Just sixty years afterward, as we learn from the census ofNew York had a population of 3,; while that of Virginia was only 1, being less than half the number of New York.

Inthe exports of New York amounted to $2,; the exports of. Chap. Page: I.—From the Tribune to the War Department: 1: First meeting with Mr. Lincoln—Early correspondence with Mr.

Stanton—A command obtained for General Frémont—The new energy in the military operations—Mr. Stanton disclaims the credit—The War Secretary's opinion of McClellan—Mr. Dana called into Government service—The Cairo.

The Battle of Glorieta Pass, fought on March, in northern New Mexico Territory, was the decisive battle of the New Mexico Campaign during the American Civil War. Dubbed the "Gettysburg of the West" by historians, it was the decisive blow by Union forces to stop the Confederate invasion of the West along the base of the Rocky Mountains.

Horace Walpole's prophecy will be verified when there shall be a Xenophon at New York and a Thucydides at Boston. Up to this time the most remarkable contribution this country has given to the world is the Author and subject of this book, now being introduced to the public.

Letter to the German Republican Central Committee of New York, Febru State Suicide and Emancipation. Letter to a Public Meeting at the Cooper Institute, New York, March 6, Removal of Disqualification of Color in carrying the Mails.

Bill in the Senate, Maand Incidents: Ransom of Slaves at the. Speech of Hon. Erastus Brooks, in the Senate, Feb. 7th, 8th and 13th,the Lemmon slave came and slavery-secret societies and oaths-grounds of opposition to Mr.

Seward-the common schools of New York-the Bible in our schools-the pure franchise-a better system of naturalization-American ambassadors abroad-American rulers at home. Full text of "History of the United States from the Compromise of to the McKinley-Bryan campaign of " See other formats.

The New York Herald of December 4, rejoiced in the evidence that Republican leaders were ‘ready now for terms of compromise with the South, which every Republican a month ago would have scouted as degrading to the most servile Northern doughface’.Lincoln stood firmly against compromise on slavery extension; on the other hand, at a.

It was now argued by Mr. Blair and Mr. Curtis that he is a citizen of Missouri, and the defendant a citizen of New York. The defendant pleaded in abatement to the jurisdiction of the court, that the plaintiff was not a citizen of the State of Missouri, as alleged in his declaration, being a negro of African descent, whose ancestors.

Search the world's information, including webpages, images, videos and more. Google has many special features to help you find exactly what you're looking for.

The jubilee of the Constitution: a discourse delivered at the request of the New York Historical Society, in the city of New York on Tuesday, the 30th of April,being the fiftieth anniversary of the inauguration of George Washington as President of the United States, on Thursday, the 30th of April, New York: S.

Colman. You can write a book review and share your experiences. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.

Downes v. Bidwell, U.S. () Downes v. Bidwell. Argued JanuaryDecided U.S. ast|>* U.S. ERROR TO THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE UNITED STATES FOR THE SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF NEW YORK Syllabus.

By MR. JUSTICE BROWN, in announcing the conclusion and judgment of the Court. HISTORICAL AND LEGAL EXAMINATION OF THAT PART OF THE DECISION OF THE SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES IN THE DRED SCOTT CASE, WHICH DECLARES THE UNCONSTITUTIONALITY OF THE MISSOURI COMPROMISE ACT, AND THE SELF-EXTENSION OF THE CONSTITUTION TO TERRITORIES, CARRYING SLAVERY ALONG WITH IT.

With an Appendix, CONTAINING: I. The Debates in the Senate in March,between Mr. Webster and Mr. At a speech at Cooper's Union inWendell Phillips of the Republican Party said the following: I judge Mr.

Lincoln by his acts, his violation of the law, his overthrow of liberty in the Northern States. I judge Mr. Lincoln by his words and deeds, and so judging, I am unwilling to trust Abraham Lincoln with the future of this country. Mr. This banner text can have markup. web; books; video; audio; software; images; Toggle navigation.The result was the celebrated "Missouri Compromise," which in effect allowed the formation of the Missouri Constitution without restriction, but declared that slavery should not extend in any new-formed State north of 36 degrees 40 minutes north : L.

U. Reavis, Nathaniel Holems, William Tecumseh Sherman, J. W. Scott, Horace Greeley, William Darby.(New York, ), 13, ; Statistical Abstract of the United States, (Wash­ ington, D.C., ), Missouri contained route-miles of railroad in ; in the figureFile Size: 10MB.